Justice League

Bruce Wayne enlists the help of his superhero pals to fight a dangerous enemy.

  • Starring: Ben Affleck, Amy Adams
  • Director(s): Zack Snyder
  • Producer(s): Jon Berg, Geoff Johns, Charles Roven, Deborah Snyder
  • Screenwriter(s): Chris Terrio, Joss Whedon, Zack Snyder
  • Distributor: Warner Brothers
  • Animal Coordinator: Stunt Dogs & Animals
  • Release Date: Friday, November 17, 2017
  • Rating: Outstanding

Featured Animal Action

In the scene where the actors fight on a rooftop and the pigeons in a coop react, the trainer brought the pigeons from his van to the set in a wooden carrier. The trainer also placed four water bowls in the coop and filled with drinking water. The crate was placed next to the door of the coop and the doorway was covered with a large tarpaulin to ensure no escapes were possible. The trainer removed one pigeon at a time from the container and placed each pigeon into the coop, one at a time. The trainer then closed the door and secured it with a tie wrap. Water and food were topped up regularly throughout the day by the trainer. On wrap, the pigeons were caught individually by the trainer and placed in wooden container and taken back to the van.



In the scene where we see a dog sitting on a street corner with a dog,  the trainers made their dog to look dirty by applying earth bought from his home which was mixed with water that was rubbed into his coat. The handlers remained on set just out of frame at all times. When the actor was in position, sitting on the floor, the dog was asked to lie down with his head on the actor’s leg and commanded to stay.



In the scene where the police arrest a man in front of a grocery store and we see dogs on leashes in the background, the street was closed to public traffic, and the trainers were highly experienced with film work. The dogs were also experienced at film work and public appearances. No animal was left unattended at any time. The animal company undertook a complete risk assessment prior to filming and their results were available to all cast and crew with the call sheet.

In the scene where the actress gets into her truck and her dog sits in the passenger’s seat, the American Humane rep checked the condition of the front seat prior to filming.

The car remained stationery throughout the filming of the scene. The dog was placed into the car, jumping in himself on command. After filming the scene, trainers brought the dog back to the van.

In the scene where we see a man on horseback riding across an Icelandic vista, the horse was tacked up to its trailer. The horse stood just off set and held by the owner until the camera was ready to turn over. Once they were ready, the trainer led the horse into position.  Some food was placed on the ground, to encourage the horse to stand in this spot.  A stunt double was introduced to the horse and held the reins.  For the takes, the trainer backed away, leaving the stunt double holding the horse. As soon as the horse was out of the shot, the trainer took the reins and held the horse still.

In the scene where Wonder Woman and her compatriots ride to cliff and get off their horses, this scene was filmed on green screen in a studio. Rubber matting had been placed on the floor of the studio. Once the stunt riders and actresses were mounted, the trainers stood off-camera ready to grab the reins of the horses if necessary. They filmed the scene and the horses were brought outside while they positioned the camera. When we see these same riders approach a cave, these scenes were also filmed on green screen, with a mixture of actors and stunt riders, riding horses to mouth of cave and getting off their horses. The scenery will be filled in with special effects in post. Likewise, when a woman hands the other women a box and they ride off, the riders on set cantered their horses 100 feet to the far end of the set. A very simple A to B trajectory.

When the woman passes the camera and stops holding her dog, trainers placed the dog in the actor’s arms. They stood off camera as actress did a simple A to B trajectory holding the dog.